“Flexible Printed Electronics: From Materials Characterization to Device Integration” by Dr. Tse Nga (Tina) Ng, Palo Alto Research Center

WHEN:
02/12/2013 3:30 pm - 02/12/2013 4:30 pm
WHERE:
CPE 2.218
Phone: 512-471-5238
200 E. Dean Keeton St., Austin, TX, United States, 78705 Google Map

Seminar Abstract

Dr. Tse Nga (Tina) Ng, Palo Alto Research Center

Solution-processed electronic materials have been developed to enable manufacturing platforms complementary to conventional silicon technology. These electronic inks can be deposited and patterned by low-cost printing tools such as inkjet printers and gravure presses. Notably, the printing process is compatible with many substrates ranging from plastics to fibers, to potentially integrate electronics on any surface. At Palo Alto Research Center, I have developed processes for printed electronics that enable new form factors and applications in flexible displays and sensors. Some examples include flexible medical x-ray imagers and integrated logic-memory arrays. These applications required development of both individual device components as well as system integration.

In this talk, I will present the advantages and limitations of printed devices, and then discuss how to integrate the individual components together by using complementary organic transistor circuits. I will show how to tackle the challenges of device variations and stability in the integrated systems. Device characterization and circuit simulations are carried out to achieve designs that tolerate the variations in printed devices, as well as to determine design rules for reliable thin-film electronic systems. Both device structures and system-level view of printing are considered, in order to improve the reliability of the processes and accelerate the development of flexible electronics.

Biography

Dr. Tse Nga (Tina) Ng is a Senior Research Scientist with the Electronic Materials and Device Laboratory at Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). She joined PARC in 2006, and since then her research has focused on flexible electronics. Her work on printed systems has received the 2012 Innovation Award from Flextech Alliance and has been named Runner-up for the Wall Street Journal Technology Innovation Award. Tina received her M.S. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Cornell University, NY, USA, working with Professor John Marohn on the development of force measurement techniques, such as cantilever magnetometry and electric force microscopy, to study nanoscale phenomena in organic semiconductors.

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